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Johns Hopkins Center on Aging and Health

Mini Med School on Aging and Health, Fall 2011
presented by the Johns Hopkins Odyssey Program
in cooperation with the Center on Aging and Health

The JHU Center on Aging and Health has partnered with the Johns Hopkins Odyssey Program for an 8-session Mini-Med School focusing on Aging and Health during Fall 2011.  The course schedule, descriptions and slides are presented below (please note: audio will be posted as soon as possible).

Course Schedule, October 6, 2011 to December 8, 2011

DateCourse DescriptionDownloads
Oct 6

Late life development: Basic theories, concepts and findings. How and why we age has been a preoccupation of human beings from the ancient Greeks and before, and remains an area of cutting edge discovery and research. In this talk we will review basic explanations for how and why humans age, taking a look both at historical (Aristotle to Erikson) and modern theories (e.g., the free radical theory).? We will also review several key concepts that have helped shape the history of gerontology including senescence, functioning, quality of life, successful aging and disability. ? We will also cover basic demographic, epidemiologic and sociologic findings in order to set the stage for the rest of this series. Our goal will be to place aging within the broader context of life course development, placing emphasis on continued maturation, increasing heterogeneity, and the implications of the extension of the human life cycle for the individual and society. Thomas Glass, PhD, Associate Professor, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

Slides (PDF)

Audio (MP3)

Oct 13Bridging Aging Biology to Human Health. There are likely multiple aging-related changes in biological and physiological pathways that contribute to health and functional outcomes in older adults. These include chronic activation of inflammatory pathways, altered immune system function, and declines in energy generation from mitochondria. Understanding changes in these pathways are key to developing improved treatment and preventive modalities that will add years to life and improve overall health and well-being. Present understanding of these connections, and ongoing biological and clinical translational research efforts in this area, will be detailed in this session. Jeremy Walston, MD, Raymond and Anna Lublin Professor of Geriatric Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.

Slides (PDF)

Audio (MP3)

Oct 20Addressing the Well-being of Older Adults: Millions and More at a Time. With the first baby boomers reaching older adult status this year, we are entering a period of staggering demographic shift toward older ages in our population. In preparation for this event, the past 40 years have seen a wealth of research on health, disability, frailty and adverse outcomes in large epidemiological cohorts of older adults. This presentation will open with a historical perspective on the evolution and future projections over time of global age and lifespan distributions, prevalence and incidence of disease and disability, and the compression of morbidity in older adults. It will proceed to present key advancements in the epidemiology of aging in recent decades, including advances in early detection and prevention for disability and frailty, the extent and implications of heterogeneity of health status in older adults, and the development of interventions to promote robust health in older adults.  Emily Agree, PhD, Director, Hopkins Center for Population Aging and Health and Associate Professor, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health; Paulo Chaves, MD, PhD, Assistant Professor, Geriatric Medicine and Epidemiology, Center on Aging and Health-West.

Slides 1 (PDF)

Slides 2
(PDF)

Audio (MP3)

Oct 27

Hear, hear: the effect of hearing loss on your health and what to do about it. Many of us take hearing loss for granted as an inevitable part of aging and regard it as a minor nuisance in everyday life. However, recent research increasingly shows that hearing loss is associated with adverse health effects including social isolation, poorer cognitive abilities, and an increased risk of developing dementia. We?ll examine what is known about hearing loss today, its effects on health, and what to do about it.  Frank R. Lin, MD, PhD, Assistant Professor, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.

Slides (PDF)

Audio (MP3)

Nov 3

Innovative models of health care delivery to save Medicare. People with multiple chronic conditions account for a majority of Medicare expenditures. This talk will focus on innovative health service delivery models that can improve care and help Medicare remain solvent. Bruce Leff, MD, Professor, Director, Center on Aging and Health-East, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.

Slides (PDF)

Audio (MP3)

Nov 10Mending the Heart, Feeding the Mind. High blood pressure, high cholesterol, high blood sugars and obesity are all well established risk factors for heart attack, stroke and dementia in older adults. We will review evidence on the effects of non-pharmacological (exercise and diet) and pharmacological (prescription and over the counter medications) treatments on these vascular risk factors and on brain and cognitive health. Michelle C. Carlson, PhD, Associate Professor, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health; Sevil Yasar, MD, PhD, Assistant Professor, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.

Slides (PDF)

Audio (MP3)

Dec 1

Best Practices for Maintaining Cognitive Health in Older Age. This presentation will: 1) Describe the nature and scope of cognitive changes with age; 2) Identify the types of best practice interventions that are most effective with older adults in a variety of clinical and community settings; and 3) Discuss specific strategies for improving memory, concentration and everyday function in older adults. George W. Rebok, PhD, Professor, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health; Elizabeth Tanner, PhD, MS, RN, Associate Professor, Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing.

Slides (PDF)

Audio (MP3)

Dec 8

Changing the task to fit you, not just you to fit the task. As we grow older, some tasks become more difficult. Learn of the science of environmental modification and device use to allow older adults to stay independent as long as possible. Sarah L. Szanton, PhD, CRNP, Assistant Professor, Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing.

Slides (PDF)

Audio (MP3)

 
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